redwood trees in forest near san francisco

Where to See Majestic Redwood Trees Near San Francisco

There is something majestic about redwood trees, one of the tallest species of tree in the world. Not only are these magnificent trees several dozen feet taller than their closest competitor, but redwood trees are some of the world’s oldest as well. Although they are not quite as old as dinosaurs, these tall trees have been around longer than people and most types of animals.

The typical redwood tree stands 300 feet high, but these giants of the forest can grow even taller than that. Big Basins Redwoods State Park in Santa Cruz, California, has the distinction of being home to the tallest redwood tree in the United States at 329 feet. Big Basins’ amazing tree is just 50 feet smaller than the world’s tallest redwood tree affectionately known as Hyperion.

Best Sites to View Redwood Trees in Northern California

With its amazing beauty and height, is comes as no surprise that people want to see the redwood tree species for themselves when visiting San Francisco and the surrounding areas. Below are five convenient locations for locals and visitors to take in the sight of the world’s tallest tree species. The following redwood grove locations are all within driving distance of Chili House SF, with one of them (Golden Gate Park) located just minutes away.

Golden Gate Park

Already a popular tourist destination for other reasons, Golden Gate Park is also home to Heroes Grove. This redwood grove area is one of the city’s largest green spaces, providing an escape into nature for the thousands of people who work and live in San Francisco’s mostly urban environment.

Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park

With just under 15 miles of hiking trails, this state park is smaller than most others in the area. However, it still has plenty of redwood trees to view. Visitors to Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park can choose to take a guided walk on Saturdays and Sundays to learn more about the space and the trees that grow there.

Muir Woods National Monument

John Muir was a well-known naturalist who dedicated his time to the study and upkeep of California’s outdoor spaces. The monument named in his honor is one of the most popular places to view redwood trees within San Francisco. These trees are up to 1,200 years old and reach heights up to 258 feet tall. Since Muir Woods attracts over one million visitors a year, the best way for sightseers to avoid large crowds is to visit the park immediately after it opens.

Humboldt Redwoods State Park

The location of this park is approximately 45 miles from San Francisco. Visitors will enjoy experiencing Rockefeller Forest, known for its continuous old-growth forest of redwoods along the West Coast. Humboldt Redwoods State Park is also home to three redwood trees located on the Avenue of the Giants.

Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park

Just a 30-minute drive from San Francisco in the city of Oakland, this park was the home of a huge logging operation in the 1880s. Today, people come to Reinhardt Redwood Regional Park to see the largest collection of natural coast redwood trees located in the East Bay.

Fun Infographic on Redwoods by a Young Chili House Customer

At Chili House, we love our customers, especially children who are always welcome in our restaurant. Made with authentic ingredients, our Chinese cuisine is very nutritious. Kids especially love our Peking Duck, which is packed with both flavor and protein.

On a recent visit to Chili House, one young customer showed off a wonderful infographic she recently made with our staff. We liked it so much, we decided to share it here in our post about the majestic Redwood tree. Thanks to Isabella Ho, a 4th Grader at Bella Vista Elementary School in San Ramon!

Did you know fourth graders and their families in California are eligible a free pass to access 19 state parks for a full year. Click here to learn more

Redwood trees live for thousands of years and are an essential part of forest ecosystems. They also contribute positively to climate change, something that anyone concerned about the environment should appreciate.

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